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  • The San Juan Daily Star

Professional associations form alliance to work in common front


The new Alliance of Technical-Professional Associations of Puerto Rico proposes to face the challenges of its member associations “in a common front that really represents us with dignity and serves as an official, strong and effective voice in favor of [our] common interests and demands.”

By The Star Staff


The Expert Electricians Association of Puerto Rico (CPEPR by its Spanish initials), Automotive Mechanics and Technicians Association (CMTA), the Refrigeration Technicians Association (CTRPR), and the Master and Journeyman Plumbers Association (CMOP) signed an agreement this week that establishes the new Alliance of Technical-Professional Associations of Puerto Rico (ACTPPR by its Spanish initials) whose purpose is to defend their common interests and build a culture of mutual support among them.


According to the agreement, the ACTPPR proposes to face the challenges of its member associations. CPEPR President Frances Berríos said “we are working on the construction of a common front that really represents us with dignity and serves as an official, strong and effective voice in favor of the common interests and demands of our associations and association members.”


“This body will represent us with dignity and collectively and we will work together and in solidarity,” he added.


Julio Bonilla, president of the CMTA, said “the [ACTPPR] will also work with the recognition of our members and against those who promote voluntary membership to the professionals represented by each of the signatories of the agreement.”


“This is one of the important aspects that we will work on through an effective common front that fits our needs,” he said.


Antonio Figueroa Rey, who heads the CTRPR, said “this alliance is also created to carry out legislative efforts, promote favorable legislation to the signatory associations and our representation in government agencies.”


“The technical-professional associations did not have an organization that adequately represented us,” he noted. “For a long time, we have been devalued by those who do not want to recognize us as professionals. Today we unite to do justice to all our comrades.”


Jimmy Solivan Cartagena, leader of the CMOP, made it clear that “for us it is important that the associations have effective processes of citizen orientation and a common defense against everything that represents a danger to the professional institutions that have done so much good for Puerto Ricans.”


“When our associations were created there was, and still is, a compelling interest that justifies our existence,” he said. “Our institutions are necessary for Puerto Rico and guarantee safety for all citizens.”

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